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Ping Yong’s Team Published Review Article in Gut Mircobes

September 30, 2021      Author:

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease. AD risk increases significantly with age, thus greatly endangering the health condition and self-reliance capacity of the elderly. Cause of AD is complex, which may vary from person to person, but shows high consistency in brain pathology, such asβ-amyloid (Aβ) burden and neuron loss. In recent years, emerging studies have observed gut microbiota (GM) alterations in Alzheimer's disease (AD), even in individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI).

Recently, titled "Sleep, circadian rhythm and gut microbiota: alterations in Alzheimer's disease and their potential links in the pathogenesis" in Gut Microbes. The article summaries the impact of sleep, circadian disruption and AD on GM alterations and especially unanimity. It further emphasizes the impact of sleep and circadian rhythm disruption on GM. For example, the increase of intestinal bacteria and the decrease of helpful bacteria would damage GM and thus lead to systematic inflammation, Blood Brain Barrier damages, and local inflammation of the brain, and finally cause AD.

 

Author: Project team of Bio-X Research Institute, SJTU

Source: Bio-X Research Institute, SJTU

Translated by Zhang Wenying

 

ABSTRACT:

In recent years, emerging studies have observed gut microbiota (GM) alterations in Alzheimer's disease (AD), even in individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Further, impaired sleep and circadian patterns are common symptoms of AD, while sleep and circadian rhythm disruption (SCRD) is associated with greater β-amyloid (Aβ) burden and AD risk, sometimes years before the clinical onset of AD. Moreover, reports have demonstrated that GM and its metabolites exhibit diurnal rhythmicity and the role of SCRD in dampening the GM rhythmicity and eubiosis. This review will provide an evaluation of clinical and animal studies describing GM alterations in distinct conditions, including AD, sleep and circadian disruption. It aims to identify the overlapping and distinctive GM alterations in these conditions and their contributions to pathophysiology. Although most studies are observational and use different methodologies, data indicate partial commonalities in GM alterations and unanimity at functional level. Finally, we discuss the possible interactions between SCRD and GM in AD pathogenesis, as well as several methodological improvements that are necessary for future research.